Working Papers

Authors: Wilfried Kisling, Antonio Tena Junguito

Aug 2019

This article identifies and analyzes the determinants of the success of German exports to Argentina between 1875 and 1913, the fastest emerging market in South America at that time. New German technology and increasing productivity were complemented by banking and financial support for trade. We find that industrial sectors linked to German foreign banks (Auslandsbanken) in Argentina benefited from privileged access to financial support and hence exported more in comparison with other leading industrial countries. Our findings contribute to the literature on Latin American emerging markets and the role of finance in the development of foreign trade.

Reference: 171

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Authors: Sarah Clifford, Panos Mavrokonstantis

Aug 2019

We study behavioural responses to a widely-used tax enforcement policy that combines ele¬ments of self- and third-party reporting. Taxpayers self-report to the tax authority but must file documentation issued by a third-party to corroborate their claims. Exploiting salary-dependent cutoffs governing documentation requirements when claiming deductions for charitable contribu¬tions in Cyprus, we estimate that deductions increase by £0.7 when taxpayers can claim £1 more without documentation. Second, using a reform that retroactively shifted a threshold activating documentation requirements, we estimate that at least 64% of the response is purely a reporting adjustment. Finally, reporting thresholds affect the responsiveness to tax subsidies.

Keywords: Tax enforcement, Tax compliance, Charitable giving, Tax design

Reference: 876

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Authors: Ferdinand Rauch, Stephan Maurer

Aug 2019

This paper studies how the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914 changed market access and influenced the economic geography of the United States. We compute shipment distances with and without the canal from each US county to each other US county and to key international ports and compute the resulting change in market access. We relate this change to population changes in 20-year intervals from 1880 to 2000. We find that a 1 percent increase in market access led to a total increase of population by around 6 percent. We compute similar elasticities for wages, land values and immigration from out of state. When we decompose the effect by industry, we find that tradable (manufacturing) industries react faster than non-tradable (services), with a fairly similar aggregate effect.

JEL Codes: F1, R1, O1, N72

Keywords: Market access; Panama Canal; trade shock; gravity

Reference: 875

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Authors: Johannes Johnen, David Ronayne

Jul 2019

We study a canonical model of simultaneous price competition between firms that sell a homogeneous good to consumers who are characterized by the number of prices they are exogenously aware of. This setting subsumes many used in the literature over the past several decades. Our result shows that there is a unique equilibrium if and only if there exist some consumers who are aware of exactly two prices. The equilibrium we derive is in symmetric mixed strategies. Further¬more, when there are no consumers aware of exactly two prices, we show there is an uncountable-infinity of asymmetric equilibria in addition to the symmetric equilibrium. Our result shows that the paradigm generically produces a unique equilibrium; that the commonly-sought symmetric equilibrium is robust; and that the asymmetric equilibria are knife-edge phenomena.

JEL Codes: D43, L11

Keywords: price competition; price dispersion; unique equilibrium

Reference: 874

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Authors: David Ronayne, David P. Myatt

Jun 2019

We propose a two-stage replacement for established “clearinghouse" or “captive and shopper" pricing models: second-stage retail prices are constrained by first-stage list prices. In contrast to the mixed-strategy equilibria of single-stage games, a unique profile of distinct prices is supported by the play of pure strategies along the equilibrium path, and so we predict stable price dispersion. We find novel results in applications to models of sales, product prominence, advertising, and consumer search.

Keywords: price dispersion, clearinghouse models, prominence, advertising, buyer search

Reference: 873

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Authors: John Muellbauer

Jun 2019

Empirical evidence on what drives house prices, such as income changes, extrapolative expectations and differences in supply elasticities, is important. In many countries, house price movements in major cities such as the capital are more extreme and often seem to lead the rest of the country. This chapter therefore proposes a framework for analysing prices at a regional level, with an application to London illustrating its leading role and the ripple effect in other UK regions. As is also shown for Paris, capital cities are more sensitive to interest rates and credit conditions, and international investors can play an important role (perhaps leading to affordability problems for local residents). After the crisis, debt-to-income ratios have risen strongly which, together with the higher interest rate sensitivity of housing in cities, may impede the normalisation of interest rates.

Reference: 872

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Authors: Vanessa Berenguer Rico, Bent Nielsen, Søren Johansen

May 2019

A uniform weak consistency theory is presented for the marked and weighted em­pirical distribution function of residuals. New and weaker sufficient conditions for uniform consistency are derived. The theory allows for a wide variety of regressors and error distributions. We apply the theory to 1-step Huber-skip estimators. These estimators describe the widespread practice of removing outlying observations from an intial estimation of the model of interest and updating the estimation in a second step by applying least squares to the selected observations. Two results are presented. First, we give new and weaker conditions for consistency of the estimators. Second, we analyze the gauge, which is the rate of false detection of outliers, and which can be used to decide the cut-off in the rule for selecting outliers.

JEL Codes: C01, C22

Keywords: 1-step Huber skip, Asymptotic theory, Empirical processes, Gauge, Marked and Weighted Empirical processes, Non-stationarity, Robust Statistics, Sta-tionarity

Reference: 871

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Authors: C. Knick Harley

May 2019

Authors: Christa N. Brunnschweiler, Steven Poelhekke

May 2019

Does institutional change in the petroleum sector lead to more oil and gas ex-ploration and discoveries? Foreign ownership and investment in the sector has tra-ditionally been unrestricted. We document that this is no longer the case; foreign-domestic partnerships are the norm today. Tracking changes in legislation between 1867 and 2008 for a panel of countries, we show that switching to foreign ownership results in more drilling and more discoveries of petroleum than domestic ownership. Switching to partnership yields even more drilling, but yields fewer discoveries. Dis¬coveries, and the intensity and quality of exploration drilling, are endogenous to industry-specific institutional change.

JEL Codes: E02, O43, Q30

Keywords: discoveries, oil and gas, natural resources, institutions

Reference: 219

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Authors: Vanessa Berenguer Rico, Bent Nielsen, Søren Johansen

May 2019

An extended and improved theory is presented for marked and weighted empirical processes of residuals of time series regressions. The theory is motivated by 1-step Huber-skip estimators, where a set of good observations are selected using an initial estimator and an updated estimator is found by applying least squares to the selected observations. In this case, the weights and marks represent powers of the regressors and the regression errors, respectively. The inclusion of marks is a non-trivial extention to previous theory and requires refined martingale arguments.

JEL Codes: C130

Keywords: 1-step Huber-skip; Non-stationarity; Robust Statistics; Stationarity

Reference: 870

Individual View

Authors: Stephen Broadberry, Leigh Gardner

Mar 2019

Estimates of GDP per capita are provided on an annual basis for eight Sub-Saharan African economies for the period since 1885. Although the growth experienced in most of SSA since the mid-1990s has had historical precedents, there have also been episodes of negative growth or “shrinking”, so that long run progress has been limited. Despite some heterogeneity across countries, this must be seen as a disappointing performance for the region as a whole, given the possibilities of catch-up growth. Avoiding episodes of shrinking needs to be given a higher priority in understanding the transition to sustained economic growth.

Reference: 169

Individual View

This paper investigates how counterterrorism that targets terrorist leaders, and thereby undermines control within terrorist organizations, affects terrorist attacks. The pa¬per exploits a natural experiment provided by strikes by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones) ‘hitting’ and ‘missing’ terrorist leaders in Pakistan. Results suggest that ter¬rorist groups increase the number of attacks they commit after a drone ‘hit’ on their leader, compared to after a ‘miss’. This increase amounts to 29 terrorist attacks (43%) worldwide per group in the six months after a drone strike. Game theory provides sev¬eral explanations for the observed effect. Additional analysis of heterogenous effects across groups, and the impact of drone hits on the timing, type and target of attacks, attacks by affiliated terrorist groups, infighting and group splintering, indicates that aggravated problems of control (principal-agent and collective action problems) explain these results better than alternative theoretical mechanisms.

JEL Codes: D74, F5, O10

Keywords: Terrorism, Targeted Leader Killing, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Reference: 218

Individual View

Authors: David Ronayne, Greg Taylor

Mar 2019

Abstract

We study strategic interactions in markets where firms sell to consumers both directly and via a competitive channel (CC), such as a price comparison website or marketplace, where multiple sellers’ offers are visible at once. We ask how a CC’s relative size influences market outcomes. A bigger CC means more consumers compare prices, increasing within-channel competition. However, such seemingly procompetitive developments can raise prices and reduce consumer surplus by weakening between-channel competition. We also use the model to study relevant active policy issues including price clauses, integrated ownership structures, and access to consumers’ purchase data.

Revised March 2019

JEL Codes: JEL D43, D83, L11, M3

Reference: 843

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Authors: Guido Ascari, Timo Haber

Mar 2019

This paper proposes a minimal test of two basic empirical predictions that ag-gregate data should exhibit if sticky prices were the key transmission mechanism of monetary policy, as implied by the benchmark DSGE-New Keynesian models. First, large monetary policy shocks should yield proportionally larger initial re-sponses of the price level and smaller real effects on output. Second, in a high trend inflation regime, prices should be more flexible, and thus the real effects of monetary policy shocks should be smaller and the response of the price level larger. Our analysis provides some statistically significant evidence in favor of a sticky price theory of the transmission mechanism of monetary policy shocks.

JEL Codes: E30, E52, C22

Keywords: Sticky prices, local projections, smooth transition function, time-dependent pricing, state-dependent pricing

Reference: 869

Individual View

Authors: Harold Carter

Feb 2019

Social intervention by governments in liberal democracies faces two major problems. The first is that it tends to reward the majority at the expense of the weak; there is no agreed way to trade-off the claims of different groups on a limited pool of resources, so it comes down to political muscle. The second is that support for intervention depends on a continuing flow of new resources, to fix each new problem while still preserving the interests of existing clients – and as a result, subsidies and controls multiply, despite the fact that they often pursue conflicting goals. In the early days of the British welfare state these dilemmas were resolved by shared assumptions that were fundamentally illiberal, excluding some groups altogether and enabling a clear pecking order amongst the rest. By the end of the century these narratives had largely been rejected. What happened was not a collapse in the fact of collective provision (which continued to grow) but a collapse in the narrative by which it was understood. Unable to resist popular pressure to spend more, governments were also unable to build the public confidence necessary to persuade taxpayers to pay for what they wanted. The easiest course of action was to give in to vested interests; to fund as much as possible by borrowing, on and off the balance sheet; and once the money started to run out, to give in to the most powerful groups, and to pay proportionately less attention to the less vocal.

Reference: 168

Individual View

Authors: Anja Tolonen

Feb 2019

Does industrial development change gender roles? This is the first paper to causally explore the effects of a continent-wide expansion of a modern industry on gender roles, captured by attitudes and behaviors. Identification relies on plausibly exogenous spatial-temporal variation in gold mining in Africa. The establishment of industrial-scale mines induces female empowerment—justification of domestic violence decreases by 19%, women have better access to healthcare, and are 31% more likely to work in services— alongside rapid economic growth. Findings are robust to assumptions about trends, distance, and migration and show that gender roles can change rapidly with economic development.

Revised February 2019

JEL Codes: O12; O13; J16

Keywords: Gender Roles, Female Empowerment, Local Industrial Development, Gold Mining

Reference: 209

Individual View

Authors: Elizabeth Baldwin, Yongyang Cai, Karlygash Kuralbayeva

Feb 2019

Applying climate policy in practice means considering capital stocks: some assets will pro¬duce pollution whenever they are used, and some will not. Therefore long-term abatement plans should influence current investment. Moreover, newer technologies exhibit learning-by-doing in the deployment of associated infrastructure. We investigate these ideas from both theoretical and numerical perspectives. An increasing carbon tax will reduce investments in assets that pollute, and so reduce emissions in the short term: our “irreversibility effect”. We also show that the optimal innovation subsidy increases with the deployment rate: our “acceleration effect”. Considering second-best settings, we show that, although carbon taxes achieve stringent policy targets more efficiently, subsidies to the “renewables” sector deliver higher welfare when policy targets are more mild.

Revised February 2019

JEL Codes: O44, Q54, Q58

Keywords: Infrastructure, Clean and Dirty Energy Inputs, Renewable Energy, Stranded Assets, Carbon Budget, Climate Change Policies, Green Paradox

Reference: 204

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Authors: Saeed Moshiri, Gry Østenstad, Wessel N. Vermeulen§

Feb 2019

This study investigates the effects of an oil boom on firms’ performance using data from the Canadian Annual Survey of Manufactures. We exploit the time variation of the booming natural resource sector activity in an oil-producing area with the location of manufacturing plants. We hypothesize that the effect of the booming sector on plants depends on their spatial proximity, which allows us to create an exogenous treatment variable. The outcome variables include plant-level wages, employment, sales, and exports. We find that the effect of the booming sector on the incidence of exporting varies greatly by plant-level productivity. More productive plants become more likely to export relative to less productive plants. They can do so by paying a higher wage, while employment grows less than plants that serve only the domestic market. We find that initial productivity and plants’ ability to export provides an important differentiation in average plants effects. In particular, while there is a great variety in the effect by sector, a clear linkage with the resource industry is not observed.

JEL Codes: L6, O4, R11, R15

Keywords: natural resources, heterogeneous firms, regional economics

Reference: 216

Individual View

Authors: Peter Neary, Monika Mrázová

Feb 2019

We provide an overview and synthesis of recent work on models of monopolistic competition with heterogeneous firms in international trade, paying particular atten¬tion to pass-through, selection effects, competition effects, and matching endogenous with exogenous distributions. A recurring theme is that CES preferences are extremely convenient for deriving analytic results, but also extremely restrictive in their theoret-ical and empirical implications. We introduce the class of “constant-response demand functions” to describe some related families of demand functions that provide a unifying principle for much recent work that explores alternatives to CES demands.

JEL Codes: F12, L11, F23

Keywords: Heterogeneous Firms; Pass-Through; Quantifying Effects of Globalization; Super- and Sub-Convexity; Supermodularity

Reference: 868

Individual View

Authors: Roberto Bonfatti, Yuan Gu, Steven Poelhekke

Jan 2019

Africa’s interior-to-coast roads are well suited to export natural resources, but not to support regional trade. Are they the optimal response to geography and comparative advantage, or the result of suboptimal political distortions? We investigate the political determinants of road paving in West Africa across the 1965-2012 period. Controlling for ge¬ography and the endogeneity of democratization, we show that autocracies tend to connect natural resource deposits to ports, while the networks expanded in a less interior-to-coast way in periods of democracy. This result suggests that Africa’s interior-to-coast roads are at least in part the result of suboptimal political distortions.

JEL Codes: P16, P26, D72, H54, O18, Q32

Keywords: political economy, democracy, infrastructure, natural resources, development

Reference: 215

Individual View

Authors: Margaret Meyer, Inés Moreno de Barreda, , Julia Nafziger

Jan 2019

This paper studies information transmission in a two-sender, multidimensional cheap talk setting where there are exogenous constraints on the (convex) feasible set of policies for the receiver and where the receiver is uncertain about both the directions and the magnitudes of the senders’ bias vectors. With the supports of the biases represented by cones, we prove that whenever there exists an equilibrium which fully reveals the state (a FRE), there exists a robust FRE, i.e. one in which small deviations result in only small punishments. We provide a geometric condition, the Local Deterrence Condition, relating the cones of the biases to the frontier of the policy space, that is necessary and sufficient for the existence of a FRE. We also construct a specific policy rule for the receiver, the Min Rule, that supports a robust FRE whenever one exists.
 

Revised January 2019

JEL Codes: D83,D82,C72

Keywords: Cheap talk, information transmission, multisender, full revelation, robustness

Reference: 789

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Authors: Ian Crawford, Peter Neary

Jan 2019

Changes in product characteristics on the extensive margin are an important and hitherto neglected dimension of quality change. Standard techniques for quality-adjusting price indices cannot handle such changes satisfactorily, which leads to an economically and statistically significant bias in the measurement of prices and real output. We combine theoretical insights from index numbers and demand for charac¬teristics to develop a new method for incorporating changes on the extensive charac¬teristic margin. Applied to data on new car sales in the U.K., our method leads to revisions in estimated inflation rates for this commodity group that are both plausible and quantitatively important.

JEL Codes: C90, C91, C92, D03

Keywords: Extensive and Intensive Margins of Consumption; Characteristics Model; Quality Change; Sato-Vartia-Feenstra Index Numbers

Reference: 867

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Authors: Jennifer Castle, Takamitsu Kurita

Jan 2019

We employ a newly-developed partial cointegration system allowing for level shifts to examine whether economic fundamentals form the long-run determinants of the dollar-pound exchange rate in an era of structural change. The paper uncovers a class of local data generation mechanisms underlying long-run and short-run dynamic features of the exchange rate using a set of economic variables that explicitly reflect the central banks’ monetary policy stances and the influence of a forward exchange market. The impact of the Brexit referendum is evaluated by examining forecasts when the dollar-pound exchange rate fell substantially around the vote.

JEL Codes: C22, C32, C52, F31

Keywords: Exchange rates, Monetary policy, General-to-specific approach, Partial cointegrated vector autoregressive models, Structural breaks.

Reference: 866

Individual View

Authors: Ferdinand Rauch, Kristiina Tuomikoski

Jan 2019

Ferdinand Rauch, Kristiina Tuomikoski

This paper presents a number of facts on the use of the Bodleian libraries by Oxford students. We pay particular attention to the importance of the distance between a student’s home and a library on the choice of which library to use. This small scale distance elasticity is an important parameter for urban economics. We find a distance elasticity of around -0.3, closer to zero than observed in related studies.

JEL Codes: F14, R12

Keywords: Library usage, Distance elasticity, Gravity model

Reference: 865

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Authors: Mark Armstrong, John Vickers

Dec 2018

We study mixed-strategy equilibrium pricing in oligopoly settings where con-sumers vary in the set of suppliers they consider for their purchase-some being captive to a particular firm, some consider two particular firms, and so on. In the case of "nested reach" we find equilibria, unlike those in more standard models, in which firms are ranked in terms of the prices they might charge. We character-ize equilibria in the three-firm case, and contrast them with equilibria in the parallel model with capacity constraints. A theme of the analysis is how patterns of consumer interaction with firms matter for competitive outcomes.

JEL Codes: C72, D43, D83, L15

Reference: 864

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